Our website publishes news, press releases, opinion and advertorials on various financial organizations, products and services which are commissioned from various Companies, Organizations, PR agencies, Bloggers etc. These commissioned articles are commercial in nature. This is not to be considered as financial advice and should be considered only for information purposes. It does not reflect the views or opinion of our website and is not to be considered an endorsement or a recommendation. We cannot guarantee the accuracy or applicability of any information provided with respect to your individual or personal circumstances. Please seek Professional advice from a qualified professional before making any financial decisions. We link to various third-party websites, affiliate sales networks, and to our advertising partners websites. When you view or click on certain links available on our articles, our partners may compensate us for displaying the content to you or make a purchase or fill a form. This will not incur any additional charges to you. To make things simpler for you to identity or distinguish advertised or sponsored articles or links, you may consider all articles or links hosted on our site as a commercial article placement. We will not be responsible for any loss you may suffer as a result of any omission or inaccuracy on the website.

In France, Eiffel Tower goes dark in tribute to Queen Elizabeth

by uma
Editorial & Advertiser disclosure

PARIS (Reuters) -The Eiffel Tower’s lights went dark early on Thursday night in tribute to Queen Elizabeth, with Parisians recalling a British monarch who anchored her country through upheaval with poise and grace for longer than many have lived.

The 1997 death in Paris of Princess Diana prompted Elizabeth to endure some of the darkest days of her 70 years on the throne, when the palace appeared disconnected from the outpouring of public grief.

At the Flame of Liberty monument above the underpass where Diana was killed, some passers-by paused to remember Britain’s longest-reigning monarch.

“She was the person who defined Britain,” said optician Salima Gersa.

Another woman, Valerie, a museum worker, said Elizabeth’s death marked “the end of an era”, describing her as “an extraordinary woman who saw the world around her crumble.”

Others paid tribute to a monarch who remained a symbol of stability and continuity for Britons at a time of relative national economic decline, while also adapting the ancient institution of monarchy to the demands of the modern era.

“(Her death marks) a tragic moment, but she had a great life and has a great legacy,” said U.S. tourist Greg Shanon.

(Reporting by Antony Paone; Writing by Richard Lough; editing by Deepa Babington)

 

You may also like